Friday, June 29, 2012

Like Riding a Bike

Isn't that what everyone says when you do something you haven't done in a while? It wasn't quite that easy remembering all the little modifications specific to getting Murphy warped up but it was close. It all came back to me how to get the warp lashed on to the back apron and how nicely the old Purrington angel wings worked with it.



 Out of all the looms I have had or have, this one is the easiest hands down to get the warp rolled on. Having said that, the time you gain in getting the warp on you give to threading and sleying. The breast beam is fixed as is the beater. A small concession really as old Murphy rarely disappoints in the weaving. A small warp was put on for another string of prayer flags. I used the opportunity to change the pattern. I'm using Ginny's Coat (pg.30 Var. 1) from "A Handweaver's Pattern Book".



 In fact I never even had to change the tie up from two plus years ago when I last wove something on this loom. Of course, Jack is excited to get weaving. He's not too sure of that tilting bench though and neither am I, but we're going to give it another go.



In sewing news, not much. Another Marcy Tilton/Vogue french housedress was completed. Pattern 8813 is awfully fun to make, and fun to wear. It really does fit the bill as being the "go too" garment around the house.



Big pockets, loose cool fit and of course you can get so creative with fabric choices. This one is in a toile. How much more French can you get? I love toiles but for the most part, they are relegated to fabric more suited for use around the home as opposed to around the body. Happily I found a pretty girlie toile in a lightweight cotton that was suitable for a garment.



 A little pink and brown mini print and a brown and cream plaid for the pocket linings and the dress was done.



 The fabric is from the French General line by Moda and has such beautiful selvages, I used those too for the pocket ties.

In farm news, the weather has been either wet and cool or almost warm. The grass ( such as it is) is tall and green and I've been rotating a horse out to graze every couple of hours.
All my horses are use to this. Basically, throw a halter and lead rope on, flip the lead rope over their back and let him loose. They always stick around. I've tempted fate and put all three out loose at once, but they are more likely to roam further afield than I would like as a complete herd. When it's time to switch out for a change, just bring a carrot and whomever is out is more than willing to be "caught".

Parting shot: Dandy, always "Mr Photogenic".

11 comments:

  1. Jack, you have the most sweetest smile and what a marvelous weaver you are!

    The fabric you used for your new top is wonderful, love the pattern and the colors.

    All your horses always look so beautiful and well taken care of, I admire your farm very much.

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  2. Murphy sure looks like a sweet loom! Have you ever tried folding it up part way to thread the heddles? That's what I do with my Compact (Leclerc version of the Baby Wolf). It at least saves my upper back from working on a dowager's hump.

    Love the new top.

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  3. I can't believe you got your old loom back!! That's SO amazing!! What luck!

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  4. a murphy was my first loom too. i mostly weave rugs on it now since i got my norwood. but i couldnt agree more with how easy it is to warp. loved seeing another cherished murphy :)

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  5. That top is tooooo fun! I keep seeing that pattern, and wondering if I'm up to it. I know I'm not up to looming! They'd have to cut me loose, I just know it!

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  6. Cindie, Thank you, it's fun to pick out the fabrics and put it together.

    Thistle Rose, Jack can seem a little prickly to strangers but in so many ways he IS such a sweetie.And of course, that face! Thank you for the compliments on the horses. They are a happy calm crew and always a joy to be with. My farm is small with little diversity so it may be just easier in that way without a lot of different species.

    Valerie, No I haven't tried that, but next go round I will. Thank you for the great idea!!

    Amanda, It was lucky and I am so happy to have him back.

    Heatherabarrick, WOW, you are the first person to tell me they also have a Murphy loom. They are hard as hen's teeth to find too. Where they all the 42" weaving width? I've never heard of one smaller or larger.

    prttynpnk, It's getting a lot of reviews on PR. I know the gal that inspired it ( Sandi at FOV, my local fabric store) so we've had lots of fun picking out fabrics for it. It's a relatively easy project except for the hem. That can take a bit of time to get it looking even with those pockets but well worth the effort.

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    1. mine is the same size as yours.they were origionaly made in seattle and i live 50 miles south of seattle so they do come up on craigslist every now and then around here.ive looked and looked but cannot find any info on the murphy co however, my dear hubby informs me that it is pre-ww2 due to the hardware. i love my old loom.i taught myself to weave on it:)a fellow guild member has an allen loom that is very similar.it was enjoyable to see yours in action :) lovely flags!

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  7. What a cute weaving helper you have! And I love the top! And that's from someone who isn't too crazy about pink, LOL.

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  8. So i found a loom quite similar to this one on craigslist in kent washington and i cant find any information on it what so ever. This post is old but its the closest ive come to a break through! :) can anyone help me?

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